The Boston Theological Institute
ANTS  |   BCSTM  |   BCTD  |   BUST  |   EDS  |   GCTS  |   HDS  |   HCRS  |   HCGOST  |   SJS

Toward an Abrahamic Family Reunion Project (TAFRP)

This project works together with the Abrahamic Family Reunion, a program of the Eselan Center for Theory and Research and Track Two: An Institute for Citizen Diplomacy, Joseph V. Montville, Director. To see the wider work begin pursued under the direction of Montville, see www.abrahamicfamilyreunion.org. As stated on their website:

The Abrahamic Family Reunion (AFR) project offers ways to use psychological and spiritual approaches in reconciling conflicts among Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the United States. AFR emphasizes our shared values of compassion and justice, explores positive historical precedents, and acknowledges collective traumas. By providing resources for organizations in its network, AFR seeks to enhance the possibility of contrition and reconciliation among civil and religious representatives of the three Abrahamic traditions. AFR is a network of organizations bound together by the notion that all peoples seek and deserve dignity.

 

TAFRP is a course developed in light of Montville's work and encouragement and offered through Boston College and elsewhere under the auspices of the BTI that draws together Roman Catholic and Protestant Christian, Jewish and Islamic thinking on the nature of our differences and shared histories.

 

This program among BTI schools is developed in two phases:

1. Research as undertaken by primary researchers as such feeds into the development of educational materials.

2. Course  or courses offered under different settings in BTI schools or elsewhere.

 

The initial course as offered through Boston College, Department of Theology in 2009 Spring and Fall terms):

Th 531 Toward an Abrahamic Family Reunion:

Issues of Religion and Identity*

Instructors: Rev. Raymond Helmick, SJ and Dr. Rodney Petersen,

Dr. Abdel-Rahman Mohamed and Rabbi Sanford Seltzer,

with Guest Lecturer Jerome Maryon, Esq.

 

 

 

I. Course Description

Jews, Christians and Muslims are commonly referred to as members of the Abrahamic family of faith since each faith claims Abraham as its progenitor.  Christianity and Judaism experienced a "parting of the ways" during the inception and development of Christianity.  Islam emerged as a further prophecy and self perceived clarification of earlier prophetic witness in the seventh century. (622 CE) The purpose of this course is to explore initial family relationships, what factors contributed to the emergence of separate communities of belief and practice, often in conflict with one another despite their common ancestry, and the role played by these conflicts in the shaping of critical historic periods.

 

Today deep issues of religious identity that are either specific to this family of faiths or particularly exacerbated by the nature of the relationships between them are at the heart of current political and military tensions in the Middle East and elsewhere.  The inter-religious team that teaches this course will explore the social and religious dynamics of these situations, drawing upon the different but related traditions of scripture, comparative religion, theology, mysticism, history, philosophy, diplomacy and law. It is clear that Abrahamic family relations will have enormous implications for the shaping of the 21st century for good or for ill.

 

* This course title is taken from the Fetzer Institute Project of this name and is being developed with their encouragement.

 

 

II. Grading

Students are to write three papers:

1. First “Impressions” Paper (c. 5 pp. double-spaced with endnotes and bibliography as appropriate): How do you understand the role of your faith with respect to the other Abrahamic traditions? (Due on October 14.)

2. “Case Study” Paper (c. 5 pp. double-spaced with endnotes and bibliography as appropriate): This paper should develop a case study of the role of religion in relation to a particular theological disagreement or conflict. Your case study should offer a brief narrative of the conflict, a summary of the main points of contention to date, and a proposal for how to work through the issues under consideration and with the parties in dispute, together with religious participation. (Due no later than November 18.)

3. Final “Summary” Paper (c. 10 pp. double-spaced with endnotes and bibliography as appropriate). This paper can be a research paper of your choice on a topic to be worked out with one of the course instructors. (Due on December 16.)

 

Active participation in all aspects of the course and its readings is presumed.  Each week attention will be given to items from the suggested reading list, for which class participants will write short content summaries for brief presentation in class.

 

 

III. Field Work

Class participants are expected to attend at least one of the following events. If unable to fulfill, alternative experiences will be developed with the course instructors. (A one page paper will be asked from each student with a summary of reflections on the nature of one such event attended.)

 

  • An iftar at the Roxbury Islamic Center during Ramadan (during September this year)
  • A synagogue visit
  • Christ the King celebration, St. Paul’s Church, Cambridge, Sunday Nov. 22, 11:00 AM.
  • A Protestant service, to be decided (Reformation Sunday, Nov. 1?)

 

IV. Websites and Related Organizations

 

 V. Schedule of Classes

 

1) Sept. 9        Introduction to the Course

(Petersen and team) 

  •  
    •  
      • Course Syllabus
      • Basic Texts and Scripture: Thoughts on The Tanach, The Bible and The Qur’an
      • Methodologies of Faith Propagation (Historical, Conventional and Contemporary Models of Mission)
      • Three levels on which inter-faith understanding must rise or fall: the personal, which involves dialogue with one’s neighbors but also asking oneself what the experience of the HOLY maybe; the academic and the official. 
      • Thoughts on Genesis 25

 

 

                        Suggested Reading:

Many course readings may be obtained from the class website beginning in January 2008.

  • Rothbart, Daniel, and Korostelina, Karina, eds., Identity, Morality, and Threat: Studies in Violent Conflict (Lexington Books, 2007).  Read Chapter 14: Montville, Joseph. “Reconciliation as Realpolitik: Facing the Burdens of History in Political Conflict Resolution” 
  • Qur’an, Surah 3: Al ‘Imran
  • Karen Armstrong, A History of God: The 4,000-Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity and Islam (Ballantine Books, 1994): Begin to read the book. A book to be read through the context of the course:

 

  • See bibliography, “Basic Introductions,” for books you may wish to read through the context of this course and thereafter.
  • Scriptural material about Abraham; take any version of the Bible, Tanach or Qur’an or you may choose to read the new translation of the same as found in David Rosenberg, Abraham. The First Historical Biography (New York: Basic Books, 2006).

 

 

2) Sept.16       Biblical Roots: Tendencies Toward Supersessionism: Understanding the Covenant.  The Pauline Heritage – Romans 10: 5-8; 9-11; Genesis 17

                        (led by Seltzer, Petersen and team)

  • Who are the Children of Abraham?
  • Tensions within “Judaisms”: “Pharisaic Movement-become-Rabbinic Judaism-become Judaism”
  • The Pauline Heritage (Jesus and Paul): “Jesus’ Movement-become-Christianity;” or “Christianities”
  • A Muslim Perspective on Judaism and Christianity: corrective supercessionism.

 

A Parting of the Ways: The Second to the Fourth Centuries

                        (Helmick and the team)

  • Texts: Romans 2:25-29; Acts 15
  • Orthodoxy and Heresy
  • Rabbinic Tradition

 

Required Reading:

  • Daniel Boyarin, Border Lines: The Partition of Judaism and Christianity (Philadelphia: University of Penn Press, 2006 ed.), pp. 1-86
  • Boys, Mary C. Has God Only One Blessing? Judaism As a Source of Christian Self Understanding (New York: Paulist Press, 2000), pp. 5-85; pp. 138-148
  • Qur’an, Surah 20: Ta Ha

 

Suggested Additional Reading:

  • Daniel Boyarin, Border Lines: The Partition of Judaism and Christianity (Philadelphia: University of Penn Press, 2004), pp. 89-228.
  • Raymond Helmick, “How Can A Catholic Respond, in Faith, to the Faith of Muslims”
  • Sandmel, A Jewish Understanding of the New Testament; see also, We Jews and Jesus (Oxford, 1965).
  • Shaye J.D. Cohen, The Beginnings of Jewishness (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999), ch 2-5
  • Shaye Cohen, Why aren’t Jewish Women Circumcised: Gender and Covenant in Judaism (University of California Press, 2005).
  • Richard Rubenstein, When Jesus Became God: The Epic Fight over Christ's Divinity in the Last Days of Rome (New York: Harcourt, 1999).

 

 

3) Sept. 23      The Politics of the Orthodox Empire and the Birth of Islam

                        (Petersen and team)

  • History and Interpretation: Acts 1:8
  • The Monophysite Controversy  
  • The Politics of Empire 

 

Required Reading:

  • Jeremy Johns, “Christianity and Islam,” in The Oxford History of Christianity, ed. John McManners (New York: Oxford, 1990/2002): pp. 167-204.
  • Colin Chapman, Cross and Crescent. Responding to the Challenge of Islam (Downers Grove, Illinois: InterVarsity Press, 2ned ed., 2007): 73-111, 127-148.
  • John Meyendorff, The Byzantine Legacy in the Orthodox Church (Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 1982): 89-114.

 

 

Suggested Additional Reading:

  • George Every, Understanding Eastern Christianity (London: SCM Press, 1980): 53-84.
  • Steven Wasserstrom, Between Muslim and Jew: The Problem of Symbiosis Under Early Islam (Princeton, 1995).
  • Irfan Shahid, “Byzantium and the Islamic World,” in Byzanatium. A World Civilization, ed. by Angeliki Laiou and Henry Maguire (Washington, D.C,: Dumbarton Oaks, 1992): 49-60.

 

 

4) Sept. 30      Islamic Ummah, Carolingian idea of Christendom and the Jewish Diaspora: Issues of Community and Identity

                        (Mohamed and team)

  • Division and Unity in the Traditions
    • Bogomil and Catholic/Orthodox
    • Sunni and Shia
    • Jewish  Equivalences
    • Christmas 800, coronation of Charlemagne as Holy Roman Emperor, setting the stage for the Western dispute between Papacy and Empire
    • DVD: “Islam: The Empire of Faith”

 

Required Reading:

  • Abdurrahman Al-Sheha, Muhammad the Messenger of Allah (King Fahd National Library, 2005).
  • Mark R. Cohen, Under Crescent and Cross: The Jews in the Middle Ages (Princeton, 1994).
  • Judith Herrin, The Formation of Christendom (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1989): 445-480; if time see also pp. 390-444.
  • Miri Reuben: Gentile Tales – The Narrative Assault on Late Medieval Jews (Philadelphia: University of Penn, 2004).

 

Suggested Additional Reading:

  • Efraim Karsh, Islamic Imperialism: A History (New Haven: Yale University Press (April 26, 2006)
  • Jacob Katz, Jewish Society at the End of the Middle Ages (Schocken Books, 1971) 
  • Hugh Kennedy, The Byzantine and Early Islamic Near East. Variorum Collected Studies (Ashgate Publishing, 2006)
  • Ivan Marcus, Rituals of Childhood: Jewish Acculturation in Medieval Europe (Yale University Press, 1996)

 

 

5) Oct. 7          Faith and Europe: Confrontations and Encounters

                        (Helmick and team)

  • The Crusades – Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Interpretation
  • The Inquisition and the Concept of Christendom
  • Positive encounters: Cordova, Rumi
  • DVD: “The City of Lights”

 

Required Reading:

  • Bréhier, Louis. "Crusades." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 4. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1908. 6 Jan. 2009 http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04543c.htm
  • Avraham Grossman, Pius and Rebellious: Jewish Women in Medieval Europe (Brandeis University Press, 2004), ch 9
  • Amin Maloof, The Crusades Through Arab Eyes (New York: Schocken Books, 1989): read the introductory chapter.
  • DVD: “Islam the Empire of Faith”

 

Suggested Additional Reading:

  • David Biale, Culture of the Jews (Schocken Books, 2002), ch 1-2
  • James Russell, The Germanization of Early Medieval Christianity (Oxford University Press, 1996).
  • Edward Peters, Inquisition (Berkeley: University of California, 1989): 11-74.
  • Edward Peters, Heresy and Authority in Late Medieval Society (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 1980).
  • James Russell, The Germanization of Early Medieval Christianity (Oxford University Press, 1996).

 

 

6) Oct.14         The Reformation of Christendom; Jews and Muslims seen as the Antichrist

                        (Petersen and team)

  • Religious Dissent and Late Medieval Piety
  • The Problematic of Martin Luther: Jews, Saracens and the Antichrist
  • The Heritage of Protestant and Catholic Reformation
  • DVD: “Similarities Between Christianity and Islam”

 

Required Reading:

  • Hans J. Hillerbrand, The Division of Christendom: Christianity in the Sixteenth Century (Westminster/John Knox Press, 2007), pp. 65-138.
  • Bernard Cooperman (Ed), Jewish Thought in the 16th Century (Harvard University Press, 1983).  Essay by Heiko Oberman: Three 16th Century Attitudes to Judaism – Reuchlin, Erasmus, and Luther
  • Qur’an, Surah 19: Maryam
  • Ahmed Deedat, “What the Bible Says About Muhammad” (Islamic Propagation Center International)
  • Ahmed Deedat, “Desert Storm: Has It Ended?” (Islamic Propagation Center International)

 

Suggested Additional Reading:

 

7) Oct. 21        Continental Pietism, Kabbalah, and the Emergence of Hasidism and Sufi Mysticism

                        (Seltzer and team)

 

Required Reading:

  •  
    •  
      • Peter Erb, The Pietists: Selected Writings (New York: Paulist Press, 1983): 1-28. 
      • Ada Rappaport Albert, Hasidism Reappraised (Littmann Library of Jewish Civilization, 1997).  Parts 11 and 111
      • Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, Early Modern Europe, 1450-1789. Cambridge History of Europe (Cambridge, 2006).
      • Daniel Matt, The Essential Kabbalah (Castle Books, 1997).

 

Suggested Additional Reading:

  •  
    •  
      • Mary Fulbrook Piety and Politics: Religion and the Rise of Absolutism in England, Wurtemberg and Prussia (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984).
      • K. S. Pinson, Pietism as a Factor in the Rise of German Nationalism (New York: Columbia University Press, 1934).
  • Idries Shah, The Sufis (New York: Anchor Books, 1971).
  •  
    •  
      • Elie Wiesel, Souls on Fire (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1982).

 

 

8) Oct. 28        Reordering the State and Redefining the Other

                        (Mohamed and team)

  • Emergence of a Secular State
  • Consciousness of Religious Freedom
  • Identity of a People as an Issue/Orientalism
  • “Tout commence en mystique, et finit en politique”

 

Required Reading:

  • Edward Said, Orientalism (New York: Vintage Books, 1978).
  • Samir Amin, Eurocentrism (Monthly Review Press, 1989), pp 1-68
  • Philip Bobbit, The Shield of Achilles – War, Peace, and the Course of History (Anchor Books, 2002), Book 2 Parts 1-2

 

Suggested Additional Reading:

  • Harold Berman, Law and Revolution Volume 1: The Formation of the Western Tradition (Harvard University Press, 1983), Excerpts regarding Gregory VII and Dictatus Pape in 1075 to Henry IV and the Declaration of Boniface VIII in 1302: “He who denies that the secular sword is the power of Peter does not understand the word of the Lord.” The Doctrine of the Two Swords.

 

 

9) Nov. 4         Emergence of Empires and Nationalisms; Religious and Political Aspects of Zionism

                        (Petersen, Seltzer and team)

  • Empire and its Undoing; Birth of Nationalisms
  • Adjusting a World View: Post-Millennialism, A-Millennialism and Pre-Millennialism
  • Destruction of the Other
  • Birth of Totalitarianism; Road to Auschwitz

 

Required Reading:

  • Niall Ferguson, Empire: The Rise and Demise of the British World Order and the Lessons for Global Power (New York: Basic Books, 2004): 1-44.
  • Tom Segev, One Palestine, Complete: Jews and Arabs Under the British Mandate (London: Owl Books, 2001): 13-56.
  • Rodney Petersen, Preaching in the Last Days (New York: Oxford University Press, 1993): 227-47.
  • Hannah Arendt, The Origins of Totalitarianism (Meridian Books, 1960), Ch 1-3
  • Michael Marrus, The Holocaust in History (University Press, 1987).

 

Suggested Additional Reading:

  • David Rausch, Zionism Within Early American Fundamentalism (Miller Press, 1979).
  • Arthur Hertzberg, The Zionist Idea (New York: Doubleday, 1959).
  • John Klier and Shlomo Lambroza, Pogroms: Anti-Jewish Violence in Modern Russian History (Cambridge University Press, 2004).
  • George Antonius, The Arab Awakening (Capricorn Books, 1965).
  • Aharon Cohen, Israel and the Arab World (Boston: Beacon Press, 1976).
  • Paula Fredrickson and Adele Reinharz, Jesus, Judaism and Christian Anti-Semitism: Reading the New Testament after the Holocaust (Westminster, 2002).
  • Richard Rubenstein, After Auschwitz: History, Theology, and Contemporary Judaism (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992).

 

10) Nov. 11     Christian Social Ethics Since WWII and the Politics of Forgiveness

(Helmick and team)

  • The World of Pope John XXIII
  • The Theologies of Vatican II
  • Liberation Theology and After: Moltmann, Miroslav Volf.

 

Required Reading:

  • Geoffrey Adams, Political Ecumenism: Catholics, Jews, and Protestants in De Gaulles Free France, 1940-1945 (McGill-Queen's University Press (November 6, 2006): 2-31, 239-263, 311-324.
  • Richard McBrian, Report on the Church: Catholicism After Vatican II (New York: HarperCollins, 1992): 1-22, 181-203.
  • Nostra aetate and other Vatican II documents 
  • Donald W. Shriver, Jr. An Ethic for Enemies: Forgiveness in Politics (New York: Oxford, 1995): 218-234 and read widely as able.

 

Suggested Additional Reading:

  •  
    •  
      • Donald Shriver, Honest Patriots: Loving a Country Enough to Remember its Misdeeds (New York: Oxford, 2005).
      • Martha Minow, Between Vengeance and Forgiveness (Boston: Beacon Press, 1998)
      • John O’Malley, What Happened at Vatican II (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2008).

 

 

11) Nov. 18     Islam is the Answer: The Post-Modern Emergence of Religious Fundamentalism Among Christians, Jews and Muslims

                        (Mohamed and team)

  • Islam is the Answer, the Christian Right, Divine Deed to the Promised Land.
  • Saad Eddin Ibrahim, Muslim Brotherhood
  • Humiliation and the Woundedness of a People

 

Reading includes:

  • Karen Armstrong, Islam: A Short History (updated 2002 version).
  • John L. Esposito, Who Speaks for Islam? What a Billion Muslims Really Think (Gallup Press, 2008)
  • Geiko Muller-Fahrenholz, America’s Battle for God. A European Christian Looks at Civil Religion (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2007): 11-48, 115-142.
  • Adnan A. Musallam, From Secularism to Jihad: Sayyid Qutb and the Foundations of Radical Islamism (New York: Praeger Publishers, 2005).
  • Baagil, H. M., “Muslim Christian Dialogue” (Islamic Da’wah and Guidance Center).

 

Suggested Additional Reading:

  • Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na’im, Islam and the Secular State (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2008).
  • Paul Barrett, American Islam. The Struggle for the Soul of a Religion (New York: Picador, 2007).

 

 

[Nov.25, Wednesday, Thanksgiving holiday, no class.]

 

12) Dec. 2       A Legal Commentary on the Abrahamic Religions

                        (Maryon and Team)

 

Required Reading:

  • Consensus statement literature, e.g.,: A Common Word Between Us.  Document signed by 138 Muslim Scholars, (October, 2007): http://www.acommonword.com/
  • Leonard Swidler, Khalid Duran and Reuven Firestone, Trialogue. Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Dialogue (New London, CT: Twenty-Third Publications, 2007): Part I
  • Abdul Rauf, What’s Right With Islam is What’s Right With America. (HarperOne: New York 2004).

 

Suggested Additional Reading:

  • Will Herberg, Protestant – Catholic – Jew: An Essay in American Religious Sociology (Chicago: University of Chicago, 1983).
  • Barrett, Paul M., American Islam. The Struggle for the Soul of a Religion (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux/Picador, 2007).

 

 

13) Dec. 9       Trialogue and Politics in the 21st Century

                        (Helmick, Petersen and Team)

  • Consensus statement literature, e.g.,: A Common Word Between Us.  Document signed by 138 Muslim Scholars, (October, 2007): http://www.acommonword.com/;
  • Ecumenical dialogue among Christians and the Challenge of Interfaith Dialogue
  • Intra-Communal (Christian, Jewish, Muslim) dialogue
  • Relevance of Religion: Daily Life and Socio-Political, Economic and Psychological Relations

 

Required Reading:

  • Abdul Aziz Sachedina, The Islamic Roots of Democratic Pluralism (New York, Oxford University Press, 2001): tba.
  • Mary Boys, Has God Only One Blessing? pp. 175-278.
  • Robert Crane, Shaping the Future: Challenge and Response (Wayland, MA: Islamic Center of Boston, 1997): tba.
  • Amos Yong, Hospitality and the Other: Pentecost, Christian Practices, and the Neighbor (Maryknoll: Orbis Books, 2008): tba.

 

Suggested Additional Reading:

  • From the list below….

 

 

 

VI. Required Reading 

 

Selections from texts for weekly reading will be available on the website in January 2009. Texts for purchase include the following:

 

  1. Karen Armstrong, A History of God: The 4,000-Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity and Islam (Ballantine Books, 1994).
  2. Blyden, Edward Wilmont, Christianity, Islam and the African Race (San Franisco, First African Arabian Press, 1992).
  3. Daniel Boyarin, Border Lines: The Partition of Judaism and Christianity (Philadelphia: University of Penn Press, 2006 ed.).
  4. Boys, Mary C. Has God Only One Blessing?: Judaism As a Source of Christian Self Understanding (New York: Paulist Press, 2000).
  5. Abdul Wahid Hamid, Islam, the Natural Way (MELS Publishing, 1989).
  6. Leonard Swidler, Khalid Duran and Reuven Firestone, Trialogue: Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Dialogue (New London, CT: Twenty Third Publications, 2007).
  7. Amos Yong, Hospitality and the Other: Pentecost, Christian Practices, and the Neighbor (Maryknoll: Orbis Books, 2008).

 

 

VII. Toward a Wider Reading

 

A. Basic Introductions to Contemporary Conversations:

 

  • Karen Armstrong, A History of God: The 4,000-Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity and Islam (Ballantine Books, 1994).
  • Brian Arthur Brown, Noah’s Other Son. Bridging the Gap Between the Bible and the Qur’an (New York: Continuum, 2007).
  • Paul Goprdon Chandler, Pilgrims of Christ on the Muslim Road. Exploring a New Path Between Two Faiths (New York: Rowman and Littlefield, 12007).
  • Bernard Lewis, The Political Language of Islam (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991).
  • David Rosenberg, Abraham. The First Historical Biography (New York: Basic Books, 2006).

 

 

 

B. Characteristics of the Three Faiths:

 

1. Judaism:

 

Albert, Ada Rappaport, Hasidism Reappraised (Littmann Library of Jewish Civilization, 1997)

 

Cohen, Shaye J.D., The Beginnings of Jewishness (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999).

 

Cohen, Shaye J.D., Why Aren't Jewish Women Circumcized- Gender and Covenant In Judaism (U of Cal Press, 2005)

 

Hertzberg, Arthur, The Zionist Idea (Doubleday, 1959) [Is this the wrong classification?]

 

Patai, Raphael, The Jewish Mind (Scribner, 1977)

Wiesel, Elie, Souls on Fire (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1982)

 

2. Islam:

 

A Common Word Between Us.  Document signed by 138 Muslim Scholars, (October, 2007): http://www.acommonword.com/   This document, a defining one for contemporary Muslim self-understanding, is also an extraordinary outreach toward Christians, and will therefore be noted again under Relations.

 

Barrett, Paul M., American Islam. The Struggle for the Soul of a Religion (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux/Picador, 2007). [I don’t know this book.  Is it one of respect or an attack book?  If the latter, it needs to be reclassified.]

 

Boase, Roger, ed., Islam and Global Dialogue: Religious Pluralism and the Pursuit of Peace (Ashgate, 2005, 310 pages)

 

Chittick, William C., ed., The Essential Writings of Hossein Nasr (World Wisdom, 2007, 250 pages)

 

Crane, Robert, and Chaudry, Ali, eds., Islam 101: The Religion and Islam 201: The Civilization (two volumes, forthcoming 2009)

 

Crane, Robert, Shaping the Future: Challenge and Response 

 

Crane, Robert, The Natural Law of Compassionate Justice (forthcoming, 2009)

 

Donohue, John J, and Esposito, John, eds. Islam in Transition: Muslim Perspectives (Oxford, 2006), includes materials with representative selections from diverse Muslim
voices.

 

Esposito, John, Islam, the Straight Path (Oxford, 2005), updated edition of a basic presentation of Islam by a noted Christian scholar, including an epilogue on the impact of 9/11 and its aftermath.)

 

Esposito, John, Islam and Democracy (Oxford 1996)

 

Esposito, John L., Who Speaks for Islam? What a Billion Muslims Really Think (Gallup Press, 2008)

 

Fadiman, James, & Frager, Robert, eds., Essential Sufism,(Castle Books, 1998, 265 pages)

 

Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck, and Haddad, Wadi Z., eds., Christian Muslim Encounters (University Press of Florida, 1995).  A very useful set of essays on historical and contemporary theological encounters, by many of the most active voices in the field.

Hassabella, Hesham A., and Helminski, Kabir, The Beliefnet Guide to Islam

(Three Leaves, 2006, 188 pages)

 

Karsh, Efraim, Islamic Imperialism: A History (New Haven: Yale University Press, April 26, 2006)  [I need to know this book before I can classify it.  Does it belong among the Alarm books?]

 

Lumbard, Joseph E. B., ed., Islam, Fundamentalism, and the Betrayal of Tradition: Essays by Western Muslim Scholars (World Wisdom, 2004, 324 pages)

 

Moomen, Moojan, An Introduction to Shi’I Islam: The History and Doctrines of Twelver Shi’ism (Yale University Press, 1985)

 

Morgan, Michael Hamilton, Lost History: The Enduring Legacy of Muslim Scientists, Thinkers and Artists (National Geographic Books, 2007)

 

Musallam, Adnan A., From Secularism to Jihad: Sayyid Qutb and the Foundations of Radical Islamism (New York: Praeger Publishers, 2005)  [Is this the right classification?]

 

Nasr, Seyyed Hossein, The Heart of Islam: Enduring Values for Humanity, (Harper, 2002, 338 pages)

Qazwini, Hassan and Brad Crawford, American Crescent: A Muslim Cleric on the Power of His Faith, the Struggle Against Prejudice, and the Future of Islam and America (New York: Random House, 2007).

 

Rauf, Imam Feisal Abdul, What's Right with Islam: A New Vision for Muslims and the West, (Harper, 2004, 314 pages)

 

Sachedina, Abdul Aziz, The Islamic Roots of Democratic Pluralism (New York, Oxford University Press, 2001).

 

Shah, Idries, The Sufis (New York: Anchor Books, 1971).

 

3. Islamic Law:

 

al-Ahsan, Abdullah, and Young, Stephen, eds., Guide for Good Governance: Explorations in Qur'anic, Scientific, and Cross-Cultural Approaches, (Caux Round Table, IIUM, 2008, 149 pages 0

 

Feldman, Noah, The Fall and Rise of the Islamic State, (Princeton, 2008, 189 pages)

 

Kamali, Muhammad Hashim, The Dignity of Man: An Islamic Perspective, (Islamic Texts Society, 1999, 118 pages)

 

Neusner, Jacob, and Sonn, Tamara, Comparing Religions through Law: Judaism and Islam, (Routledge, 1999, 263 pages)

 

 

4. Christianity: (We have left this section relatively thin, as most of our students begin with a wider sense of the characteristics of Christianity than of either Judaism or Islam.  These books are generally about some less central characteristics of Christianity that are matters of interest.)

 

Allen, Charlotte. The Human Christ: The Search for the Historical Jesus  (New York: Free Press, 1998).

Bailey, Kenneth, Jesus Through Middle Eastern Eyes. Cultural Studies in the Gospels (Downers Grove, Illinois: InterVarsity Press, 2008).

 

Rubenstein, Richard, When Jesus Became God: The Epic Fight over Christ's Divinity in the Last Days of Rome (New York: Harcourt, 1999).

 

Sanders, E.P. The Historical Figure of Jesus (London: Penguin Books, 1996).

Shriver, Donald W., Jr. An Ethic for Enemies: Forgiveness in Politics (New York: Oxford, 1995)

 

Shriver, Donald W., Jr. Honest Patriots: Loving a Country Enough to Remember its Misdeeds (New York: Oxford, 2005)


Wiesner-Hanks, Merry E., Early Modern Europe, 1450-1789. Cambridge History of Europe (Cambridge, 2006)

 

 

5. Relations:

 

A Common Word Between Us.  Document signed by 138 Muslim Scholars, (October, 2007): http://www.acommonword.com/   [Already listed under Characteristics: Islam.]

 

Cutsinger, James S., ed., The Fullness of God: Frithjof Schuon on Christianity (World Wisdom, 250 pages)

 

Adams, Geoffrey, Political Ecumenism: Catholics, Jews, and Protestants in De Gaulles Free France, 1940-1945 (McGill-Queen's University Press (November 6, 2006)

 

Borowsky, Irvin J., Ed. Defining New Christian/Jewish Dialogue (New York: Crossroad Publishing Company,             2004).

Boyarin, Daniel, Border Lines - The Partition of Judaism and Christianity (U of Penn Press, 2004)

 

Bruteau, Beatrice. Jesus Through Jewish Eyes: Rabbis and Scholars Engage an Ancient Brother in a New Conversation (New York: Orbis Books, 2001).

 

Herberg, Will, Protestant – Catholic – Jew: An Essay in American Religious Sociology (Chicago: University of Chicago, 1983).

 

Kennedy, Hugh, The Byzantine and Early Islamic Near East. Variorum Collected Studies (Ashgate Publishing, 2006).


 Levine, Amy-Jill. The Misunderstood Jew: The Church and the Scandal of the Jewish Jesus (New York: HarperOne, 2007).

 

Said, Edward, Orientalism (New York: Vintage Books, 1978).  [This is hard to classify under the headings I am using.  Should it be under persecution?]


Segev, Tom, One Palestine, Complete: Jews and Arabs Under the British Mandate (London: Owl Books, 2001).

 

Teter, Magda, Jews and Heretics in Catholic Poland: A Beleaguered Church in the Post-Reformation Era (Cambridge, 2005)

 

Wasserstrom, Steven M., Between Muslim and Jew - The Problem of Symbiosis Under Early Islam (Princeton 1995)

Wilson, Marvin R., Our Father Abraham: Jewish Roots of Christian Faith (Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmanns Publishing Company and Center for Judaic-Christian Studies, Dayton, Ohio, 1989).

 

 

6. Persecution:

 

Banki, Judith and Eugene J. Fisher. A Prophet of Our Time: An Anthology of the Writings of Rabbi Marc H. Tanenbaum (New York: Fordham University Press, 2002).

Banki, Judith H. Ethics in the Shadow of the Holocaust: Christian and Jewish Perspectives (Chicago: Sheed & Ward, 2000).

Bunzl, Matti, Anti-Semitism and Islamophobia: Hatreds Old and New in Europe (Prickly Paradigm Press, 2007).

 

Carroll, James. Constantine's Sword: The Church and the Jews: A History (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2001).

Clark Kee, Howard and Irvin J. Borowsky. Removing the Anti-Judaism from the New Testament (Philadelphia: American Interfaith Institute, 1998).

Cohen, Jeremy. Christ Killers: the Jews and the Passion from the Bible to the Big Screen (New York: Oxford University Press, 2007).

Cohen, Mark R., Under Crescent and Cross: The Jews in the Middle Ages (Princeton, 1994).

 

Cohn, Norman, The Pursuit of the Millennium: Revolutionary Millenarians and Mystical Anarchists of the Middle Ages (New York: Oxford, 1970).

 

Flannery, Edward H., The Anguish of the Jews: Twenty-Three Centuries of Antisemitism (A Stimulus Book, Paulist Press, 1985)

 

Gottshalk, Peter and Gabriel Greenberg, Islamophobia: Making Muslims the Enemy (New York: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2007)

 

Klier, John, and Lambroza, Shlomo, Pogroms: Anti-Jewish Violence in Modern Russian History (Cambridge University Press, 2004)

 

Panitz, Esther L. The Alien in Their Midst: Images of Jews in English Literature (Rutherford: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1981).

 

Ruben, Miri, Gentile Tales - The Narrative Assault on Late Medieval Jews (U of Penn,

2004)

 

 

 

7. Books of Alarm: (In this classification belong books that basically express alienation among the three faiths, often outright denigration.  Classical as a prototype is The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, not alone among the calumnious works of anti-Semitism, of which there is a long tradition.  Mercifully, in recent literature, out of horror at the 20th-century Holocaust, outright anti-Semitic writings are less often published. 

 

Christians have become accustomed enough to books against them that they need pay little attention, despite the fad of atheist books – Hitchens, Harris et al.  Even the Ku Klux Klan type of anti-Catholic literature is a thing of the past.

 

The anti-Muslim book, though, has become a frequent feature of contemporary publishing.  Typical are:

 

Bostom, Andrew G., The Legacy of Jihad: Islamic Holy War and the Fate of Non-Muslims (New York: Prometheus Books, 2005)

 

Emerson, Steven, American Jihad: The Terrorists Living Among Us (Free Press, 2002; 2003 paperback edition) – among many other works.  Emerson stands accused, according to Wikipedia’s article on him, of exaggerating the threats posed by Islamists and of creating fictitious or unverifiable sources (examples given).

 

Pipes, Daniel, In the Path of God: Islam and Political Power (Transaction Publishers, 2002) – among many other works.  In The Nation, (2002-11-11), Kristine McNeil describes Pipes as an “anti-Arab propagandist” who has built a career out of “distortions...twist[ing] words, quot[ing] people out of context and stretch[ing] the truth to suit his purpose.”  James Zogby, former U.S. Senator and frequent Muslim spokesman, argues that Pipes possesses an “obsessive hatred of all things Muslim,” and that “Pipes is to Muslims what David Duke is to African-Americans.”

 

Yeor, Bat, Islam and Dhimmitude: Where Civilizations Collide (Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2001)

 

 

8. Theological Reflection:

 

Armstrong, Karen, A History of God: The 4,000-Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity and Islam (Ballantine Books, 1994).

 

Boys, Mary C. Has God Only One Blessing?: Judaism As a Source of Christian self Understanding (New York: Paulist Press, 2000).

Dietrich, Donald J. Christian Responses to the Holocaust: Moral and Ethical Issues (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2003).

Doukhan, Jacques B., ed. Thinking the Shadow of Hell: The Impact of the Holocaust on Theology and       Jewish-Christian Relations (Berrien Springs: Andrews University Press, 2002).

 

Fisher, Eugene J. Faith Without Prejudice: Rebuilding Christian Attitudes Toward Judaism (New York: Crossroad Publishing Company, 1993).

 

Frederiksen, Paula and Adele Reinhartz, eds. Jesus, Judaism and Christian Anti-Judaism: Reading the New Testament After the Holocaust (Louisville:Westminster John Knox Press, 2002).

Frederiksen, Paula. On the Passion of the Christ: Exploring Issues Raised by the Controversial Movie (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006).

Frederiksen, Paula. Jesus of Nazareth, King of Jews: A Jewish Life and the Emergence of Christianity (New York: Vintage, 2000).

Frymer-Kensky, Tikva. Christianity in Jewish Terms (Boulder: Westview Press, 2002).

Minow, Martha, Between Vengeance and Forgiveness (Boston: Beacon Press, 1998)

 

Ochs, Peter. The Return to Scripture in Judaism and Chrisitianity: Scriptures in Postcritical Scriptural Interpretation (New York: Paulist Press, 1993).

 

Reuther, Rosemary Radford. Faith and Fratricide: The Theological Roots of Anti-Semitism (Minneapolis: The Seabury Press, 1984).

Sandmel, Samuel, A Jewish Understanding of the New Testament (Woodstock: Skylight Paths Publishing, 2004).

 

Sandmel, Samuel, We Jews and Jesus (Oxford, 1965)

Segal, Jerome M. Joseph's Bones: Understanding the Struggle between God and Mankind in the Bible (New York: Riverhead, 2007).

Stendahl, Krister. Paul Among Jews and Gentiles and Other Essays (Philadelphia: Augsburg Fortress Publishers, 1977).

 

Swidler, Leonard, Khalid Duran and Reuven Firestone, Trialogue: Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Dialogue (New London, CT: Twenty Third Publications, 2007).

 

Yong, Amos, Hospitality and the Other: Pentecost, Christian Practices, and the Neighbor (Maryknoll: Orbis Books, 2008).

 

 

 

9. Comparative Paradigms

 

Boman, Thorleif, Hebrew Thought Compared with Greek, (Norton, 1960, 224 pages)

 

Hittinger, Russell, The First Grace: Rediscovering the Natural Law in a Post-Christian World, (ISI Books, 2003, 334 pages)

 

 

 

Instructor Contact Information:

 

 

Rev. Raymond Helmick, SJ helmick@bc.edu  

 

Rev. Dr. Rodney Petersen   petersen@bostontheological.org

 

Dr. Abdel-Rahman Mohamed  aabduhu@gmail.com

 

Rabbi Sanford Seltzer  sseltzer@hebrewcollege.edu

 

Jerome Maryon, Esq., Guest Lecturer  president@saint-paul-cspc.org

 

Paul Nicholas, Teaching Assistant        pnicholas@hds.harvard.edu

© 2008-2014 The Boston Theological Institute - 157 Herrick Rd. Newton Centre, MA 02459 - (617) 527-4880 | directions |